Here are some helpful definitions:

Home Learning Pod

The focus is on creating a physical setting to complement virtual instruction from schools, including supervision, technical support, and socialization for grade-school aged children and youth while parents attend virtual meetings and complete work.

Children could be all in the same class or school, or a mix.

Nanny Share

Particularly for babies, toddlers, and preschoolers, with a setup similar to pre-pandemic nanny shares, operating out of one or more family homes.

Caregiver could be a nanny, a preschool teacher, or a stay-at-home parent caring for their own child plus one or more others.

Microschool

A more formal and often somewhat larger group, with curriculum being delivered by an in-person teacher(s). For younger children, these may look similar to pre-pandemic preschools or daycares located in a home or meeting outdoors in nature.

These programs may require a license, depending on what state you live in, the children’s ages, and the number of children.

Playdate Pod

Pod families get together at each other’s homes or in parks for playdates, which are typically limited to a few hours each day or week.

Hybrid Pod

A pod could include aspects of multiple pod types, for example, by having time for remote learning during the day, with playdate time together with parents later in the afternoon; or by having elements of a Microschool with a part-time teacher providing enrichment activities or specialized tutoring.

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